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Poster: high flow Date: Jun 11, 2014 2:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: reply to my query

Bad shows, I saw a few and I saw a few good ones too. Most were somewhere in the middle.

In regards to tuning and long breaks between sets or songs...it is what it is(was what it was) and people made of it what they could. Near the end of the band's run (93-on) I always felt like it was all a BIG WAIT. Wait for tickets, wait in line, wait for the show, wait for the set-break to end, wait for post-drums/space, wait for the predictable encore....and it bummed me out. So, I stopped doing it. I started looking for more spontaneous musical entertainment and I discovered that I almost always prefer to enjoy music in a smaller, more intimate venue like a bar or small theater. My JGB experiences pushed me in that direction and once I discovered all the great blues, country, bluegrass, funk and metal being played in venues all around the Bay Area by highly talented but less famous artists, I did not need to seek out grand productions any longer.

I go to Los Lobos at the Fillmore annually. That is about the closest I get to a big concert these days, but the acts I've seen since swearing-off arena concerts and festivals are amazing and I never leave thinking I have missed anything.

The entire GD experience was different from other concerts, that included, but not limited to, longer tuning and set-breaks. I can't explain why, but I always assumed people dealt with it because when it worked, IT REALLY F*CKIN WORKED.

Would you prefer song set-ups like:

Jerry: This next tune is called Sugar Magnolia and it always reminds me of a time me and this girl who lived down the street snuck out at night and......

Nope I'd prefer Yellow Dog, Move-O Back-O and Don't Hang from the Balcony Idiot.

It's just another quirk that made this band unique.

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jun 11, 2014 5:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: reply to my query

You make great points. My frustration started to boil when I realized Id drive through the desert, go in early to get a good seat, watch the opening act , then sit through the equipment change. The dead finally hit the stage and they whip out a 6 song stinker. To add insult to injury, the set break turns out to be significantly longer than the 45 mins they just played. Then comes wave to the wind, teleprompters that don't help Jerry, samba and 40 mins of drums and space.

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Poster: high flow Date: Jun 12, 2014 11:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: reply to my query

Uh, yep.

Then you'd see JGB(or Garcia/Grisman) and get 2.5 Hours of great tunes and zero stinkers.

Did JGB play any stinkers??

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jun 12, 2014 12:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: reply to my query

The trade off, however, was that with JGB the setlist would repeat after 2 gigs. Would have been nice to see more songs in the constant rotation. I think if you exclude the few in 1995 and a good chunk in 1984 where he was giving out after 7 songs the JGB shows were always solid

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jun 11, 2014 7:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: reply to my query

Hmmm. Speaking as a not-many-shows-in-the-90s person, it seems like it may have evolved from "lots of noodling during tuning" to "short first set > long long set break." Which is two different things and I think would effect the audience differently.